My Cup o' Joe

MyCup o' Joe Week 07

Marvel E-i-C Joe Quesada continues his weekly column talking about the "Iron Man" movie, revealing a bevy of preview art featuring Spider-Man and the X-Men, and answering more of YOUR questions!

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MyCup o' Joe is the weekly communiqué from Marvel Comics Editor in Chief Joe Quesada to the legion of Mighty Marvelites Assembled! Every Friday, Joe will sit down with journalist Jim McLauchlin to answer questions on the pressing issues of the day at Marvel and throughout comics. And YOU get to play, too! Make sure and leave your questions for Joe here at MySpace, or here at Marvel.com! JM: So. How many times have you seen the "Iron Man" flick already? JQ: Quite a few at this point. I've lost count. JM: I was at the Marvel L.A. screener on Wednesday, and didn't see you. Where the hell were ya? JQ: I was right here in wonderful ol' NYC. I was invited to the L.A. premiere, but I decided to watch it closer to home. Our east coast office, the Marvel publishing office, was having its screening on the same day as the L.A. premiere, only sans the big stars and red carpet. This was the first Marvel screening that my daughter was finally old enough to attend, so not being able to take her out of school to fly off to L.A. for the big premiere, I wanted to be here with her to experience her first Marvel screening. JM: So what's the six-year-old review on the flick? JQ: It was bit scary for her at times, but in the end she was blown away. JM: Okay, I'll admit it—I'm horrifically jaded. I just don't go to movies anymore unless I get to go for free on a premiere or junket or somesuch, and I get free popcorn. How do you feel about thee things? Are you jaded as well? JQ: I'm never jaded when it comes to our films, I always get jazzed before every premiere and opening weekend. However, truth be told, I'm not a big celebrity gawker kind of guy. It's never been my style. Well, except for when I met Katee Sackhoff at a party last year at San Diego Comicon. JM: So, outside of anything comic book-y, any flicks you're looking forward to seeing? You can show your sensitive side and admit you like chick flicks here, you sissy-Mary. JQ: Have to admit I'm looking forward to seeing "Speed Racer." I hope it rocks. When I saw the trailer for the first time, I wasn't sure what I thought of it. But the next time I saw it, I started to get into the whole "anime comes to life" mindset of it. Visually, I know it's going to rock. Hopefully the story will as well. However, the movie that I'm most looking forward to—that isn't on the Marvel slate, of course—is "Wanted." Sure, it was created by one of my dearest friends, but it looks incredible despite the fact that Mark Millar has some involvement in it [laughs]. Also, Mark owes me quite a bit from a previous gambling debt, so I'm hoping this makes some big bucks. I have this image of wee Mark Millar jumping and swimming, like Scrooge McDuck, in a pile of gold coins. It's sometimes the littlest things that make me giggle to myself. JM: This discussion begs a larger question. We have, sake of example, a new "Iron Man" flick, and concurrently, a new INVINCIBLE IRON MAN series. How much is Marvel's publishing driven by what Marvel might be doing on a movie front? And/or how much of Marvel's movie front is driven by publishing? JQ: There's not a lot of back-and-forth between the studio and Marvel publishing until we get right in the moment. And when we do, there are some unique opportunities offered to us by our movies that make our job in publishing easier. Now that we are our own studio, Marvel Studios is looking more at what we have going on in publishing and trying to coordinate as well as they possibly can. On the flip side, we look at what they have planned, and maximize benefit. For example, at the time of a movie release we absolutely put in the extra effort on the characters about to hit the mainstream spotlight. To not do this would just be foolish. This is usually reflected with an extra mini-series here, a significant story arc there, and several appropriate collected editions. Doing this for us was much more labor-intensive back in the day before we had a real collected editions department, and we had to create tons of new product out of whole cloth. Now with a huge library of trades, we're able to satiate the need, especially in bookstores, for movie character specific product. And you see we're doing it with Iron Man with some new trades. JM: That said, solely on a publishing front, we're a mere five days away from SECRET INVASION #2. What's in store, kemosabe? JQ: We're bringing back Mark Gruenwald's fan-favorite character "Buried Alien." No, sorry, got confused there for a moment. Identity crises. There will be moves and counter-moves. Rampaging dinosaurs. A heart-rending reunion. The Young Avengers on the streets of Manhattan. And Skrulls, Skrulls, Skrulls! JM: I'm gonna try and leave the recently completed New York Comic Con behind now, but I gotta tell ya—many, many folks still mentioned to me that you looked so different after dropping a lot of weight. How much poundage did you shed? JQ: About 90 pounds. I'd like to lose another 30. JM: You could just cut off your head. JQ: You're not the first to suggest that. But then, what about the other 29 3/4 pounds? JM: You beat me to the punch line. What's the secret? I'd like to ace about 15 pounds, maybe. JQ: I've seen you, Jim. Just 15 pounds? Those man-boobs are heavier than 15 pounds, my friend. JM: They're pecs, Joe. Pecs! JQ: Sure, keep saying that to yourself. Just like the flab around my stomach is just my abs taking a nap. The secret was actually a simple one. I went to an old-school nutritionist here in New York. He doesn't believe in any fad dieting of any kind. No eating five times a day with smaller meals, none of that stuff. He just believes in eating stuff that's better for you than what we're accustomed to, and making the right dietary choices every day. So, stuff like white carbs, sodas—diet or otherwise—and red meats for the most part had to be taken off my menu for a while, along with a few other things. Remarkably, portion control had less to do with it than what I was eating. I then added a lot of exercise to my routine, five days a week. Truth be told, while the exercise helps with the weight loss, it's really only about 10% of it. The rest is diet. So slowly I started chipping away at it, each pound I lost inspired me to keep losing another and then another. That's all there was to it. I know many of us who are or have been overweight are looking for a quicker and easier way to do it, and I know that there our surgical options, but outside of that it just takes sticking to it. There's really no magic bullet other than just deciding to do it and make better food choices in your life. JM: Now I remember, back in the day, we played baseball and softball against each other, and you could really rake. Did you fall out of playing shape? JQ: I did for a bit, and recently over the last year or so, started to play again. JM: Are you back in playing shape? Playing any ball? JQ: Yup, sure am. I went to Mets fantasy camp over the winter and had a blast. I also caught the bug to play baseball—not that softball junk—again and joined a men's baseball league this summer. We're playing night games once a week and I'm having a blast. JM: One more con note: I wasn't there, but a couple folks told me at one of your panels, you did the fake phone call bit from Dan DiDio at DC Comics, with the punch line being he was "looking for his market share." Look, I know you say you like to stir things up and stick a thumb in the eye, but…isn't this just sophomoric? Low class? JQ: If you were there, you would have seen that it was done in great fun. It's not like you can go to a DC panel and they don't take shots at us. I'd venture to say that they probably take a few more than we do from time to time. But the truth of the matter is that it doesn't matter. It's just comics. It's fun, it's a friendly rivalry, and I think competition and the jabs here and there just intensify it and make it that much more fun for the fans. Sure, I'm sure the DC faithful don't like it, but that's okay. I've done these fake phone calls on several occasions, each with a different gag. What makes them funny is that most of the time they're actually unplanned and unscripted. It always happens when I forget-like an idiot-to turn my phone off at panels. Someone invariably calls me, usually my wife just calling me when I'm away at a show to see how I'm doing. Suddenly she'll hear me go into a shtick…and it peeves her off to no end. One time, she wouldn't speak to me for an entire day afterward. JM: I know you're always talking the "friendly rivalry," but seriously—If I had to categorize the response I've heard, it's largely, "Overall, Joe seems a decent guy, but that's real expletive expletive." JQ: Honestly, folks need to lighten up. It's not like I attacked anyone personally, it's all done with tongue placed firmly in cheek. And as I said, DC gives just as good as they get. The problem is that our panels are just more interesting and reported in greater detail [laughs]. Zing, bam! See what I just did there? There's another! Another thing to remember—and if you came to our panels you'd understand this—we poke more fun at ourselves on our panels than anything else. Heck, in the most recent "Cup o' Joe" panel, I took a swipe at myself for "One More Day." The tough thing is that when panels get transcribed on the net, you get the info but none of the nuance and fun of it all. Most of the jokes are cut out, and of course you don't get the fan reaction. Everyone needs to just settle down a bit. Either that or in the immortal words of Tony Montana, "Say hello to the bad guy." And, while we're at it, let's say hello to CAPTAIN BRITAIN AND MI: 13 #1, our first ongoing spinning out of Secret Invasion!

CAPTIAN BRITAIN AND MI: 13 #1

CAPTIAN BRITAIN AND MI: 13 #1

CAPTIAN BRITAIN AND MI: 13 #1

CAPTIAN BRITAIN AND MI: 13 #1

CAPTIAN BRITAIN AND MI: 13 #1

CAPTIAN BRITAIN AND MI: 13 #1

CAPTIAN BRITAIN AND MI: 13 #1

JM: Hello. And while we're on the subject of folks hating you, maybe a more general question: How right or wrong might it be that you tend to get "personified" with Marvel in general? It seems that if someone hates ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN, it's "that damn Joe Quesada." If they love NEW AVENGERS, it's "Man, Quesada's a genius"? JQ: My role, the way I see it, is simple. And I hope people see it this way, too: The stuff that you see here at the end of the day that's successful is really due to our brilliant creators and editors. The stuff that doesn't work, well, the buck stops here. So look no further than me. JM: So is the analogy that you're the manager on baseball team? All the credit or all the blame, but it's the players on the field that matter most? JQ: Perhaps. I will say I get way too much credit for stuff. The great stuff that we do in the Marvel Universe spawns from the minds, keyboards and pencils of our creators. When you have the players we do, it's way too easy to point at me as the editor in chief as being the responsible party. While I appreciate the consideration, it's really not justified. JM: So that said, how involved ARE you in an issue-to-issue sense? What's your involvement in ULTIMATE SPIDER-MAN #121 or YOUNG AVENGERS PRESENTS #3? JQ: My involvement is more macro-. I sit and contribute in the "big planning" creative summits, so I'm more involved with the overarching ideas behind individual stories, rather than the individual issues themselves. But even then, I spit out my ideas and then have to move on to the next project, and leave it all in the hands of the real talents who actually do the hard part. JM: And said creative summits will be topic for another week, maybe next. Your lovely and talented marketing folks are trotting out the preview of AVENGERS/INVADERS #1. Tell me about it, Buckaroo.

AVENGERS/INVADERS #1

AVENGERS/INVADERS #1

AVENGERS/INVADERS #1

AVENGERS/INVADERS #1

AVENGERS/INVADERS #1

AVENGERS/INVADERS #1

JQ: It's 12 issues of time-slipping adventure from Alex Ross, Jim Krueger and Steve Sadowski. The Invaders of World War Two find themselves mysteriously propelled to the present, where they become the object of a struggle between the rival New and Mighty Avengers teams. We also get to view the Marvel Universe of today through their eyes, giving us a unique vantage point on where things have ended up. Beyond that, we'll also see other faces from around the Marvel pantheon as the story rolls on—the Thunderbolts are heavily featured in the first issue, and we'll encounter some other surprise guests as the story unfolds. JM: Even more juicy, your marketing guys hit me with a couple upcoming AMAZING SPIDER-MAN covers. Just a week or two ago, a fan asked about a return of Venom, but I'm told this is something slightly different that just Venom… JQ: Yeah, that's Anti-Venom. JM: So that's good. Because Venom is bad. Right? JQ: As always, time will tell. At this point, all I'm allowed to say in addition is that it involves someone's Auntie. JM: Aunt Petunia? JQ: Not quite. And just wait 'til we introduce Uncle Venom.

Green Goblin

JM: And it looks like we have a return of a Green Goblin. But I'd bet donuts to Deutsche marks this isn't Harry Osborn, but rather Norman. JQ: Wow, how weak has the dollar gotten? You have to bet in foreign currency? I'll take that bet and maybe even your money. JM: Before we get into fan questions, I have a question about fan questions…which sounds kinda navel-gazing just saying it. Are you surprised by what we get? It seems we get WAY more fine-detail, characters-and-books type questions. I would have thought there would be more topline, macro- and business stuff. JQ: No, I'm never really surprised. I've been doing these kinds of columns for quite a while so it's pretty standard operating procedure for me. JM: Do you have preference as to what kind of questions we get here? Do you "like" any type more than the other? JQ: Every once in a while I get something out of the norm or a question that makes me laugh, that's always fun. The frustrating questions are the ones that, believe it or not, happen way too often. They're the questions that ask about stuff that I answer in the week's previous column or perhaps two columns previous. Those are the times when I feel like I'm doing nothing but repeating myself. JM: Last q: Speedball is still coming? JQ: He's almost here Marcos asks: Is Marvel ever gonna release Essentials collection of runs from obscure characters such as Darkhawk or Sleepwalker? Also, what about the old Marvel 2099 line? SPIDER-MAN 2099 was another great series. JQ: Marcos, while there are no plans at present for those Essentials, Darkhawk would make an interesting Classic Collection, wouldn't it? Chip asks: With Howard Chaykin coming on board to finally revive the Squadron Supreme, any chance of getting another oversized hardcover of the J. Michael Straczynski run? All of the stuff he did post-MAX plus the Nighthawk vs. Hyperion mini- would be a nice collection.

CABLE Preview Art

JQ: Chip, m'man, there are no plans at the moment. Phoenix may be good pals with Assistant Manager of Communications Jim McCann, as she wants to know: Mr. Q, With the success of X-MEN: FIRST CLASS and the addition of WOLVERINE: FIRST CLASS, will there be more "First Class"-type titles? For instance, DAZZLER: FIRST CLASS? And I promise Jim McCann didn't put me up to this. Speaking of fellow co-workers, who came up with the baby holster that Cable carries the "little red head" in? It was Brian Bendis, wasn't it? I know it! Thank you greatly for everything you have done and continue to do! And thank you for putting comics back into the mainstream of the world! Lotsa love, Phoenix

WOLVERINE: FIRST CLASS

WOLVERINE: FIRST CLASS Preview Art

WOLVERINE: FIRST CLASS Preview Art

WOLVERINE: FIRST CLASS Preview Art

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS Preview Art

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS Preview Art

X-MEN: FIRST CLASS Preview Art

JQ: Hey, Phoenix, thanks for the kind words, they're always appreciated. Currently, there are other First Class projects in the works, but it's just a tad too early to discuss them out loud. I will say this: Dazzler, could very well be a part of them. See? And who says that compliments will get you nowhere? And it was X-Men Group Editor Axel Alonso who came up with the idea for Cable's baby holster. He wanted to call the storyarc "Bjorn to be Wild" as well, but he got out-voted. Thankfully. Deadly Shaolin asks: Hola Joe, 1) Can you give us more hints or details on the image you showed at the end of a panel at New York Comic Con where a long-haired man was surrounded by wolves and had skulls at his feet? 2) Can we expect to see Kang or Count Nefaria going against the Avengers at some point? 3) Red Hulk vs. Mighty Avengers. Coming up? 4) If a fan takes it upon himself to commission an artist to revamp a character's design in a drawing, then e-mails the design to you, could it be implemented in the books if the design is really good? JQ: Shaolin, just how deadly are you? I'd just like to know before I answer your questions 1) Nope, you'll just have to stew on it for a bit. 2) Sorry, not in the immediate future. 3) It's probably inevitable. I mean, after all, the Red Hulk is secretly Ares. Wait! Who said that? 4) Nope, it can't. There are many things that go into designing our characters and being assigned freelancer work from Marvel. Many of these things have to do with getting assigned and paid by Marvel to do the work, and the legal contract behind those assignments. Also, Marvel would have to have a desire or need to have the character in question redesigned, and that's the kind of info that's only known internally. When we do have that need, we hire the artist we feel most appropriate to do the assignment. Sorry to be a downer, Shaolin. Don't hurt me. David needs some answers: Dear Joe, 1) When will Stephen King write Spider-Man? He mentioned once that he had some ideas about Spidey going crazy and believing his suit was suffocating him, and I SOOO want to read that! Make it happen, Joey! 2) Also, could you draw it? I know you've said you have too much other work, but maybe if it's not an ongoing series, you could draw it. Your Spider-Man is so freaking cool! 3) Let's say 10 years from now, maybe you have a lighter workload? Will you consider drawing Spidey again? Thanks, Joe! JQ: 1) David, your wish is also my wish. It would be great fun to see Stephen write anything in the Marvel U. However, right now there are no such plans, and we're just thrilled with all the King stuff we're currently doing (DARK TOWER)…and who knows? There might be some more down the road! Stephen's an incredibly busy guy and we're just thrilled as can be with all the current projects we have with him. 2) Thanks for the kind words. Could I draw it? Hmmmm, let me think about it for a sec—YES!!!!! Who wouldn't want to draw a project written by Stephen King? But, there's a big difference between my desire to do it, and my actually doing it—if the project existed, that is. As editor in chief and as a creator, it would be way too easy to assign myself all the plum gigs at Marvel, so my standing policy has always been that if one of my editors wants me to do a project or a cover, they have to demonstrate to me why I'm the best person, stylistically, for the assignment. After they've done that, if I can't provide a creator's name who I think would be more suitable, then I seriously think about taking the assignment. I've negotiated myself out of some pretty big gigs in the past, but I think it's only fair to all the creators we have at Marvel. 3) Yes, I'd love to draw Spidey again some day, especially with the new status quo in "Brand New Day." Robert is a Marvel Illustrated fan who asks: Joe, I love Sebastian Fiumara's sumptuous art on THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY. Any chance of getting him some regular work on a hero book? JQ: There's always a chance, Robert. We love his work as well. Aziroth is pretty happy—you answered his last question on his birthday! Now he's asking more Spidey questions and a certain article on EW.Com [insert link] may shed some light: Joe Quesada, you really made my birthday by answering my question on my 18th Birthday. For that, I offer a big "thank you" for something I can never repay. Out of curiosity, when will this symbiote character make its appearance? I really want to make sure I get this issue, as it now means a lot to me. JQ: Azrioth, it won't be long. Sorry to be cryptic, but it's coming. And don't worry, we'll let the world know well in advance. Chris from Jersey asks: Hey Joe! What's the deal with the Sentry? I know a lot of people who don't give the Sentry a lot of credit, but I love him. Will we ever see a solo series or even another mini with him? It would be totally cool to see him take on someone other then the Void. If it happens, you should do the cover for the #1 issue. Instant hit! JQ: Chris, I'm right there with you, I love the Sentry. When Paul Jenkins first pitched me the character idea, we had a blast coming up with some of the intricacies of him and his world. There's some more fun Sentry stuff in the works and some very big plans for him in late 2009 and early 2010. Keep your eyes on the sky. Robbie asks: Joe, I'm a longtime comic fan who stopped reading for a while, and recently got back into it during the tail end of Civil War when I saw the Spider-Man unmasking piece in the newspaper. I've tried to pick up some DC titles, but nothing piques my interest, and I've only read a few books from the other publishers. You guys just keep on churning out the stuff that's appealing to me. So my question (sorry it took so long!) is that if each publisher has their own group of "zombies," what do you think brings new readers to Marvel and not the other publishers? JQ: Great question, Robbie. Do you mean outside of my charm? ;-) I think the biggest reason is something that Stan Lee and company created long ago that everyone has tried to copy at one point or another: Marvel is a universe that's closer to the real world than any other, and our characters are the most human. Before the advent of the Marvel character, the hero with feet of clay, all superheroes were more godlike than human. They were more paternal and maternal figures than relatable icons. Marvel introduced the superhero we could all relate to, the hero that we could see ourselves being. This was a dynamic shift in how superhero books were being created. Add to this the fact that Spider-Man swung through New York City and not "Metropolis," and you see that Stan and crew put these humanistic characters on a real-world canvas. This canvas became the setting on which all Marvel stories were written and drawn, and it's easy to see why Marvel kicks major booty. To me, that's why stories like Civil War are so successful—because while a Marvel Universe story at its core, the "real world" metaphors are instantly recognizable to our readers. The same is true of the core metaphors behind our characters. Spider-Man and X-Men are great examples of these. I'd also add to this that I believe that our writers and artists are firing on all cylinders today, and creating some of the greatest stories in the history of the industry across a large variety of our titles. And it's clearly reflected in our market share and mainstream interest in our books. And finally, Marvel is a very different place than it was just 10 years ago. Not only are we doing some fun stuff, but when you look at our line, I can't think of a time when the variety of the types of books we're doing has ever been seen in our history. We have our superhero universes in the Marvel U. and the Ultimate Universe. We're doing Classic stories, as well as a Marvel Adventures line for kids. We have a line of books based around well-known authors such as Stephen King, Orson Scott Card and Laurel K. Hamilton. There's our MAX line for adults, and a creator-owned line in Icon. Add to all of this the fact that we have the top collected editions department in the industry, and it makes keep up and catching up much easier for the casual reader. That's a lot of variety when you consider that just 10 years ago we had no collected editions department, and all we were publishing was superhero books, half of them X-Men. Great to have you back Robbie. If you're having fun now, just wait. We're just getting warmed up! Jimi from Ohio wants to know: Joey! I'm a huge fan of OMEGA: THE UNKNOWN. I didn't know that this title actually had a history to it. I really like the indie-ish feel that the book has, and how it's not super-connected to the Marvel U. Are there any plans to bring on more indie-type books? JQ: You're in luck, Jimi! DOUBLE luck!

 As I type these words, the Marvel Underground anthology is in the works! It's four extra-sized issues, packed with short stories done by guys who you wouldn't normally find working in a Marvel book. Who's participating, you ask? Well, how about Paul Pope, Johnny Ryan, Max Cannon, Jim Rugg and Brian Maruca, James Kolchaka, Dash Shaw and Becky Cloonan—just to name a few! And if that's not enough alterna-feel for you, we've also got the CAGE! limited series, written and drawn by Genndy Tartakovsky of "Samurai Jack," "Dexter's Laboratory" and "Clone Wars" fame. The only downside to these books, though, is that since we want very badly to maintain that "indie" tone you're so fond of, these are projects that tend to move a little slowly. But be patient with us, and you'll be hip-deep in "indie" Marvel projects! Visk'Rdi insisted we include this question (284 voicemails and 629 e-mails later) Attempt 630 Joe. Your "heroes'" attempts are futile. All your Earth are belong to us. We Skrulls have read a lot about your "Nick Fury" and can't seem to grasp why he's so important. He doesn't have any special powers, I bet you I could take him in hand to hand combat, AND none of the heroes like him anymore. Do you really see him turning the tide of this invasion? JQ: Commander Visk'Rdi communication attempt 630 received. This is Skrull Repli-agent Q, Supplanting current Marvel EIC Quesada easier than expected, no one likes him anyway. Staff prefers Agent Q. So does wife. Fury is meaningless, considered low priority. Saw "Iron Man," not bad, give it four cows. Take the baby Skrulls. Hate to say it, Stark doesn't seem so bad. End transmission. Branden from Washington sent this in: Que pasa, Joe? X-MEN: LEGACY has been surprisingly fun to read. Is this a way to give Charles Xavier his own title without naming it something like "A Beautiful Mind: Professor X"? (But I totally want credit for that if you guys make something with that title!) JQ: Hey Branden. If you like what's going on in X-MEN: LEGACY, then you're in luck, since it'll keep on happening for some time. We're focusing on Professor X in that title, so while it's very X-Men-centric, he's the star in it. David from Indiana Mr. Q. Are there plans to bring the Infinity Gems or the Cosmic Cube back into the Marvel Universe? I know the gems were explored in NEW AVENGERS: ILLUMINATI, but nothing ever came of that. And bring back Thanos! JQ: Those Infinity Gems are Brian Bendis' "In Case of Emergency, Break Glass." He's got a specific idea in mind with where to go with them, so they're likely to turn up when you least expect them (or if Brian writes himself into a corner.)

 The Cosmic Cube plays a crucial role in a storyline mentioned elsewhere in this very column! How's that for service? And Thanos is reasonably dead. Reasonably.

ULTIMATUM

Barry from his iPhone sent this question in: Joe Three questions for you. 1) As we "march" on Ultimatum, what can we Ultimate fans expect after Ultimatum and what does this new "Ultimate Origins" have to do with the universe? 2) Will this just involve the Avengers-ish "Ultimates" book or will it also include Ultimate Spider-Man too? 3) Where did this Universe come from? Okay, Barry, here goes: 1) Ultimate Origin leads into Ultimatum. There is a discovery (the big discovery of the Ultimate Universe) that rocks the very foundation of some character's world. Everything they believed in turned out to be a lie. This revelation and realization sets off Ultimatum. I don't want to say much more other than some books may go away because some characters will no longer be around to drive them. Hard times a-coming to the world of the Ultimates. 2) Everyone's in the pool. 3) It's mama's belly?

ENDER'S GAME

Andrew Wiggin wants to know: Mr. Quesada, What can we expect with the "Ender's Game" comic? Is Orson Scott Card going to be writing the comic, or "watching over" it, like with the Dark Tower comic? This is one of my favorite books, so don't let me down! I know you wont! JQ: How's it hangin', Andrew? Orson will be overseeing this project from writer selection to artist selection to comments and approvals on script to pencil to colors and lettering. He has been highly involved in all aspects of the development of the "Ender's Game" and "Ender's Shadow" comic book series so far, and is committed to doing so for both projects. And who's to say whether Orson Scott Card will or won't pen a comic book or two down the line in this series? How's that for a tease? UndercoverMarvelFan had this to ask: Hi Joe, Has Dan DiDio let you in on "Final Crisis?" Who's invading their universe and calling it a crisis? JQ: Nope, UndercoverMarvelFan, for whatever reason he won't return my phone calls. Let me just say this—at Marvel, we don't have a Crisis. But we do have a look at some gorgeous pages from the conclusion of Joss Whedon and John Cassaday's epic X-Men run. Look at these pages from GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1!

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

GIANT-SIZE ASTONISHING X-MEN #1 Preview Art

Learn more about The Hero Initiative, the only federally chartered charitable organization dedicated to helping comic veterans in medical or financial need at www.HeroInitiative.org. It's a chance for you to give back to the creators who gave you your dreams. And remember, make sure and leave your questions for Joe here at MySpace, or here at Marvel.com!
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