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Understanding Wolverine: Friends

Paul Cornell talks about the non-powered civilians Logan brings into his circle and more!

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By Brett White

Writer Paul Cornell makes his triumphant return to Marvel Comics with a new ongoing series, WOLVERINE, debuting on March 13. Illustrated by living legend Alan Davis, WOLVERINE promises to take the perennial favorite into completely new territory.

Wolverine #1 cover by Alan Davis

In addition to making both friends and enemies of the super-powered persuasion, Wolverine has a knack for rounding out the calmer bits of his life with everyday people from all walks of life. In recent years, Wolverine has seen his family grow and even dabbled with long-term romantic commitment. All that's pretty astounding for a man usually described as a loner.

In the final part of Understanding Wolverine, Paul Cornell gives us a clue as to just how big a role Logan’s supporting cast will play in his new ongoing series, WOLVERINE.

And for more discussion on WOLVERINE, check back here at Marvel.com as well as Paul's blog at paulcornell.com.

Marvel.com: In recent stories, Jason Aaron and Rick Remender have had Wolverine murder his children. Do those harrowing events affect his outlook in this series?

Paul Cornell: It looks like they don't, but we might swiftly realize, yeah, that's in there.

Marvel.com: Wolverine is often characterized as a loner, but he tends to make allies everywhere he goes. What type of person is Wolverine attracted to, socially?

Paul Cornell: He isn't “a loner,” he just looks like one. He's very social. For this title, we're introducing a gang of interesting non-powered bar buddies; professionals who work in the super hero field, and so hang out in a bar that's known for that. He likes people who know what they're doing, who'll take the mickey out of him, because he has a sense of humor about himself, and he likes the feeling of being part of human life. He seeks warmth, I think.

Marvel.com: Whereas most writers keep Wolverine single or involve him in one-night stands, Jason Aaron gave Wolverine a long-term relationship with Melita Garner. Which Wolverine interests you more to write, the long-term relationship guy or the one-night stand guy?

Wolverine #1 preview art by Alan Davis

Paul Cornell: Like most of us, he's been a bit of both, and Wolverine's had time to be just about everything a person could be. I think he goes through teenage phases—like when he joined Xavier's school—and responsible phases. There is a lot of flirting in this title, and perhaps we'll feature one enormous meaningful upcoming relationship that might get an issue devoted to it.

Marvel.com: How crucial will his past be to this series, and will Wolverine be introduced to any previously unknown characters from his past?

Paul Cornell: Not crucial in the slightest. It happened, but we move forward. No unknown characters from the past, no flashbacks, at least not for a long time. Let's make not doing that the default first.

Marvel.com: Just like how Wolverine has had a wide variety of adventures, he's also had a wide variety of tone. Writers have played up the comedic side of him as well as the gritty side. Is there a side of Wolverine that you and artist Alan Davis gravitate towards?

Paul Cornell: It's quite a serious tone, my attempt at mainstream super hero book, which means that it's about character, emotion, plot plot plot. I'd say we're walking down the middle of witty and gritty.

You can pre-order WOLVERINE #1 now and get it on March 13!

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