Psych Ward

Psych Ward: Loki

The God of Mischief returns to the therapist before beginning a new chapter of his immortal existence.

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The client is a self-identified member of the Norse mythological community of gods—an “Asgardian.” As always, the client is being given the benefit of the doubt on this claim as others have expressed the possibility of it being accurate in some way and that to define this facet of his personal story, regardless of its accuracy, would mean losing him in treatment completely.

Loki: Agent of Asgard #1 cover by Jenny Frison

This “form” of Loki is the third this writer has worked with. Initially, an adult Loki sought out our services and therapy ended with his apparent demise. Sometime later a Loki presenting with the appearance of a boy in early adolescence, came to our offices. He worked with this writer until he had to terminate for vague reasons he refused to elaborate on. The Loki who presented himself today appeared to be older than that “version” but younger than the first.

Further complicating matters is that each Loki has presented with noticeably different personalities. There are some commonalities: a sense of sadness around them, jealousy, feelings of inadequacy, and an often much buried dedication to certain people or ideals. However, each incarnation shows these traits in different measure and demonstrates other interests, abilities, wants and so on.

As ever, it is a struggle for me to not compare all these incarnations against one another and read certain behaviors as indications of things adult Loki or early adolescent Loki might do. As before though, I’ve concluded that to not treat “this” Loki risks missing his unique issues and concerns. As odd as it may sound and seem, the only way to provide wholly effective care is to start from square one and act as if this is just someone else who happens to be named Loki.

Loki: Agent of Asgard #2 Cover

The client arrived with difficulty moving past the end of a series of relationships he described as very important to him. He has heretofore refused to reveal much by way of details beyond asserting to me that it is “all his fault” and that he could ask for forgiveness and, probably, be granted it, but that he believes himself unworthy of this kindness.

The client also insists the time to move on has arrived anyway and that he has a new task on the horizon, a new challenge he must meet. Here to he stubbornly resisted providing further details or entertaining any exploration of ambivalence about leaving people he cared about for new opportunities even if it was time to do so.

Overall, Loki remains as anxious to connect and rejecting of said therapeutic connection as ever. I do not rule out the possibility that he might eventually open up, but I remain skeptical.

This writer will consult with Doctors Al Ewing and Lee Garbett on the client Loki. There observations will be available in the paper entitled LOKI: AGENT OF ASGARD #1, to be released on February 5.

Psy D. Candidate Tim Stevens is a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Consultant and Psychology intern at a small(ish) university in New York City. He works with gods significantly less than usual these days.


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      3 comments
      stueyd
      stueyd

      The preview for this series in the Marvel Point #1 was actually pretty dang good! Not a big Thor or even Loki fan but it did get me interested!

      dhesi
      dhesi

      I will buy this as I am a Loki fan. Thanks